CGMs…a Few Points….Parents: We have NO Clue what Our Kids Feel About Nightime Lows!

 

CGMs.  Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGMs) are fabulous devices.  They not only remotely give you an idea on your blood glucose number they also indicate where one is trending (blood sugar rising and/or dropping).

The new Dexcom G4 Platinum looks to be a modern, thinner, easier to read, and more accurate CGM.  The Dexcom website states it is the lightest one out there at 2.4 ounces and also the signal can go three times further.

Kaitlyn had not heard that it was approved and from what I am looking at, it sure could be another great asset in Rob and Kaitlyn’s diabetes toolbox. 

I do believe that all CGMs should also have what Medtronic has created in their mySentry device.  This device can sit on your bed stand and alert you should your child’s blood glucose runs low.  It comes with bells and whistles to alert you in the middle of the night.  This device is an incredible asset and not just for the parents.  When Medtronic flew a bunch of us out to their HQ to see this device, it was a highlight for me to witness.  We were informed that people living with T1 as adults could plop this puppy right on their night stand to warn them as well.  What a godsend this device is to everyone.  I felt very naive when I learned from Kaitlyn just how much a low blood sugar during sleep plays on the minds of those with diabetes.  I asked  a million questions…..PARENTS: WE HAVE NO CLUE.  What we feel is NOTHING compared to what people with diabetes feel.  What a lesson she gave me–our fears pale in comparison to their fears. We just have no clue. 

All CGM companies need this type of device……get to work folks.  🙂

When dealing with CGMs–I still believe the best-selling point to our kids is that even though one should not dispense insulin based on the CGM readings (it is a technicality that is required for all companies to say as their accuracy is not as exact as the blood glucose meters that are not as exact as perfect as they should be if accuracy is to be exact….did you get all that?–in other words it is a disclaimer—Based on a comment from Tia–you can read her comment below–I need to add the following:  It is not ‘merely’ a disclaimer–it is a disclaimer for an absolute reason.  One should not dispense insulin based upon a CGM reading and I am not inferring anyone should…ever; until such time that they are as accurate as they need to be to dispense insulin–thank you Tia)–they will feel better in their day-to-day dealings. Mainly because of the incredible trending mechanism in CGMs that allow the individual to actually know they are running low or high BEFORE they actually feel it.

So when speaking to your kids—-let them know the CGM is an asset to make them feel better without the wide swings, THAT is the point to make.  Of course there are always exceptions to the rule.

CGMs are now a ‘must carry’ item for insurance coverage in NY State (thank you NY State Assmblyman Bob Sweeney—a POWERHOUSE in diabetes legislation) and check what this means in every state because there are restrictions how insurance coverage works for this device.

When Kaitlyn was diagnosed in 1992, these items were a pipe-dream.  Use them…..a dream becoming a reality is a good thing…..until we find that cure.

I’m a diabetesdad

 

 

 

 

 

8 thoughts on “CGMs…a Few Points….Parents: We have NO Clue what Our Kids Feel About Nightime Lows!

  1. We need one that we can read remotely — so I can see lauren’s #’s at her college 500 miles away! LOL but only kind of lol. I mean why not? smart phones do amazing things.

  2. Tom, I can easily tell you that Fallon fears nighttime lows terribly. She has had some of her worse lows then and every night she asks us to wak her when we check her blood in the night. She is scared. She wants to wake up each morning. If she has run low during the day I find her up reading at all hours because she is afraid to fall asleep. When she is wearing her CGMS she is a bit more comfortable, but not much. I would love the one on my nightstand, though!

  3. Tom, I agree all CGM should have something like the My Sentry to go along with it regardless. It would be great for a young adult who lived alone or off at college. My son ‘s sensor went off and he didn’t hear it and had a seizure. Scary no matter what age they are! He is 24. My son could not use the Medtronic sensor because of a lack of body fat. Medtronic CGM needle is longer and wasn’t as comfortable as the Dexcom.
    Judy, my son became fixated on watching his CGM causing bad anxiety. He is afraid of highs and of course aims for tight control causing lows.. I think he is afraid of having lows too now.. Such a worry for all.

  4. Having a CGM like the Dexcom 7plus helps me rest a little easier, having dexcom have a similar tool could help me from getting out of bed altogether many nights. I am excited about the new Dexcom and hope something like the MySentry is around the corner for them.

  5. We have the old version of this and really like it a lot. His teachers really love it because for them it takes some of the scare out of it some. Thanks for showing this because I knew it was coming but, had not actually gone pout and looked to see what it looked like. the one draw back to the one we currently use is that he says it is too big sometimes.

  6. “one should not dispense insulin based on the CGM readings (it is a technicality that is required for all companies to say as their accuracy is not as exact as the blood glucose meters that are not as exact as perfect as they should be if accuracy is to be exact….did you get all that?–in other words it is a disclaimer)”

    I absolutely agree that CGMS is a valuable tool, but the statement above just dumbfounds me. I not only disagree, but I would suggest that statement is inaccurate, as well as possibly dangerous. In over 2 years of constant Dexcom use, I can’t begin to count the times the readings have been off by as much as 100 points. There is no way I would ever consider bolusing off the readings. It is much more than a technicality or disclaimer. It’s advice to keep users safe.

    • It is a point worth remembering Tia—-
      As I re-read my post—you are correct; there is a reason that it is a warning and I should not have been ‘flip’ about it and will correct it.

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