The Fundraising Tradition Continues…..a Santa Claus Personal Letter to Your Child

Jolly holiday 5th Annual fundraiser benefits Diabetes Research Institute Foundation
NOTE: Your child does not have to have diabetes to receive a letter from Santa

Yes, Virginia (and Emma, and Maria, and Max, and Willie…), there is a Santa Claus. To prove it, Ol’ Saint Nick himself will send a personalized letter – complete with a North Pole stamp – to any child, in any part of the world for a minimum $20.00 donation to the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation. This jolly holiday fundraiser is up and running and you can click this SANTA CLAUS to learn how to send a letter and make a donation. Your child receiving a personal letter from Santa is certain to light up faces brighter than the star on the tree.  And of course if you do not know of anyone who would want a letter from Santa….you can make a donation to just help the DRI continue their collaborative efforts to end diabetes once and for all.

Click here to learn more about the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation.

The personalized letters, which can be requested by parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles or any other family member or friend, can include all sorts of information; like a reference to any toy, game, iPad or techno-gadget on the child’s wish list or even mention something about their pet. Santa can even encourage them and that he knows how well they have been trying to manage their diabetes as well. The fundraising campaign is open to all families everywhere, not just those affected by diabetes.

To get the hundreds, even thousands of letters out to children by Christmas day, a legion of Santa’s “elves” are standing by around the country, according to volunteer chairwoman Marie Jarcho.

“We had a tremendous response the last four years. This is a wonderful and easy way to brighten a child’s Christmas and they loved it. The more information that parents or others supply, the more personal Santa’s letter will be,” she said. “…… it is my sincere hope that people will give what they can to help the Diabetes Research Institute find a cure.”

After the debut event, one mother wrote that her child was so thrilled with the personalized letter that she slept with it every night until Christmas. The DRI Foundation is hoping for an even greater response this year.

To send a child a letter from Santa Claus, JUST CLICK HERE. The deadline for participation is midnight on December 15th in the USA and December 11th for any area outside the USA.

I am a diabetes dad.

Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.


Diabetes Awareness Month…..Is the Outside World Learning Anything?

Blue squareNovember is Diabetes Awareness Month and the 14th is designated as Word Diabetes Day.  It’s my understanding that the American Diabetes Association designated one and the International Diabetes Federation designated the other…..and it was so declared.

I think.

Now I love ‘branding’.  I love that I know what Nike means, what Polo means, and what the golden arches of McDonalds mean.  One brand means one thing.  As a diabetes community, have we missed the mark in this regard?  I mean what is the one message we want to get out in November.  In branding, you establish something that is instantly recognizable to the general public and you work hard (and sometimes billions of dollars) to ‘make that brand work’.

Remember the ice bucket challenge.  After that, everyone ran around searching for, and trying to be, ‘the next’ ice bucket challenge.  Never quite understood that because the major organizations ALL HAVE MARQUEE fundraising events that raise hundreds of millions dollars each and every year…..they already are ‘the next thing’.  A ‘next’ anything, for them, does not need to be created…….they have one already in walks and rides.  Build upon what you have.

Now I’m surely for the notion that everyone wants to ‘get involved’ and do their own thing.  But I also know that we, as a community, are constantly reflecting upon the fact that there are so many identity problems in the world of diabetes.  And during this month so many people are trying, and/or, doing their own thing that I ask, “Is the world at-large hearing or seeing one concise messaging?”  In the attempt for so many to ‘improve’ upon a blue color, or get a message out, or be the ‘cute’ new thing about diabetes that there is SO MUCH going on, the public is not hearing any message at all?

If you try to be everything to everyone, you usually end up nothing to anyone.  I have been thinking about this for a while and I have an idea.

The IDF conference, next month, is in Vancouver.  November, as diabetes month, is a full 30 days in length.  Why is there not a meeting among the tri-powerful JDRF, ADA, and the IDF; but every other organization is invited also.   In actuality, would it be wrong to have/create a diabetes council?  One representative of every organization and everyone meets at the IDF Conference and the ADA conference—twice a year.  And at this meeting, every organization is equal.

Actually this can be good for a lot of reasons but one focus could be……what is the single message needed to get out the following November?  The first half of the meeting a discussion is held and ideas are thrown about what the message would be for diabetes Awareness Month.  The list is whittled down to a few single messages, and a vote is taken and the one single message is decided.  After November, everyone can go back to doing their own thing but for one month, one message.

And that’s it.

Because the resources of the JDRF, ADA, and IDF are bigger than, well probably everyone else, they accept the challenge (on a rotation basis) to come up with that year’s creative (the design) but there are also some pretty creative people in our community and perhaps they can be asked to be part of the design team because after all, it will belong to all of us in the community.  The  message is generic, but here is the thing, there is a space for ALL ORGANIZATIONS to brand it themselves.  No matter how big or how small the organization, you can add your logo, your website, and/or your phone number to the art design with the generic message.

Now for thirty days straight, the message is the same.  The exact same. Unified. Everyone has been part of the process.  But the world-at-large is now seeing the ONE MESSAGE about diabetes that has been agreed upon by the entire diabetes community for that year.

Why try it?

Well, we all have been doing our own thing for so long, and I’m unsure what impact there really has been over the years for THE OUTSIDE WORLD to understand this disease; perhaps trying something else and working toward a unified message……well maybe that time has come……what do you think?

I am a DiabetesDad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

Diabetes????……Do I Keep My Child Home from School?

No SchoolThis is a really tough question to address but I feel it important enough to discuss.  My goal here is not to open up Pandora’s Box but rather, to create an important dialogue.  I understand each family is different and each parent must make the call on a case-by-case basis.  Let’s respect what others do, and accept it may different from what anyone else does.

When it comes to diabetes, when do you keep your child home for school?

What can you share with us that can help others make THAT call?

I can share with you what we did, and we certainly did not know more than anyone else but perhaps it can begin the dialogue.  We always went back to our goal when Kaitlyn was diagnosed; to make sure her life was as normal as other children and to try to get her life to be as close as possible if she did not have T1D.  This was our goal.  Now of course we would never put her in harm’s way but we found her to be A. Certainly more resilient than we could ever be; and B. She would have had to be up almost all night for us to keep her home and this happened, maybe a small handful of times throughout her entire schooling.

It may be that if your child is missing 20-30 days a school year, you may want to check if that needs to be the case?  Ask around.  Bring it up in support groups.  It may be completely justified; I do not have the answer.  But we should always have a check and balance to our own actions.  We always lived by the rule; we do not know what we do not know……but we can surely find out.

You could almost imagine that I would bring in the name of my dear, great, late Richard Rubin.  Richard, who coined the phrase Diabetes Overwhelmus, always made these type decisions about being a choice.  What is the choice?  It is a good choice?  What would happen if you did A vs. B?  Ask yourself.

We were always taught that it should be a very rare occasion to keep Kaitlyn home from school.  It’s important to also remember, that they are kids.  They can learn to use something if they know it will work.  It was going to be our call if Kaitlyn stayed home from school, not hers.  She was diagnosed so young that it was an easy call when to do and not to do.  When Rob was diagnosed, it was more of a discussion because he was a teen-ager already upon diagnosis.

Look, there are times that you need to do what you need to do.  But if your child is missing two or three days every week or two; the attempt should be to change that trend.  Also make sure IT IS DIABETES when you keep your child home.  Make sure there is not something else going on.

Ask a lot of questions.  Ask if they are missing a test that day, and make sure that the test and the missed homework is made up right away.  They will learn that it is better to get it over with at the due time instead of putting it off and taking up their personal time to make up lost work, if this is a cause they try to stay out of school to avoid.

Kids spend more time at school than anywhere else outside the home.  Much can happen at school that we have no idea; and it can ‘come out’ in many different ways.  From the subject matter that can not be grasped, to being bullied for a list of reasons, to getting changed to go to gym class…….we just have no idea.  So know that a change in personality a trait, may not even have anything to do with diabetes.

Almost all parents have a similar goal in making sure our kids can take part in every aspect of life as they could if they did not have diabetes.  Figure out what is right and always ask yourself, “Do others with diabetes go through this and what do they do?”  When you ask a lot of questions, you will see many trends starting to occur.  Bring your concerns to others and to your health professionals.  When you have enough information before you; you will be able to figure out what is best for your child, and soon these type of decisions will become second-nature to you.

But ask.
We really do not know………what we do not know.

I am a diabetes dad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

A MOM: I Will Never Get This RIGHT!!!!!!!

Pulling hair outI have often found myself reflecting back to the days when Kaitlyn was very, very young and we began this journey.  Do you ever reflect back?

If you are fairly new at this ‘diabetes thing’, it may seem like such a long haul ahead of you but let me share that you should look back constantly on how far you have come because you will proceed very quickly……..because you must.  I often hear parents say how much of a failure they feel at ‘doing this diabetes thing’.

No one woke up one day and said, “Okay, not only do I want to be an Olympic Runner, but I will run a race today.”  Absurd, right?

But on one day life was normal and the next, BANG….Olympic Marathon…….now GO!  You were not trained for this; you did not plan this; you could never be ready for a life after diagnosis.  And yet, here you are.

So before you beat yourself up, remember how far you have come since…..well….just yesterday.  Or since last week.  Or since last year.  At that time, the time your child was diagnosed, you KNEW NOTHING about diabetes.  And in a short time you have become an expert on so many things.

Remember this about experts, there is not a medical professional alive that does not need to do something every year to gain continuing education credits to keep their license renewed for their practice.  So every year medical professionals attend lectures, meetings, and conferences continuing their knowledge base in a field that they spent years to learn……and yet each year or two, they need to do more.

There is no continuing education credit when you have a child……it’s called being a parent.  It is a process we must work out continually.  And having a child diagnosed with diabetes…..the education never stops, nor should it.  So do not be so hard on yourself.  Remember that you are involved in something that you would never have signed up for, you had no choice and neither did your child.

Remember when you thought, I could never prick their finger to check their blood…..that could hurt them?   You have come a long way baby…….hang in there.  You know more than you think you do!  Your child is lucky to have you.

I am a diabetes dad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

Every One of these Magical Dancers has T1D…….and that Was Not The Only Magic. WOW!!!!!!!

Dancing girlsEveryone of these young ladies, dancing their hearts out, have type 1 diabetes.  Dancing for Diabetes has that kind of magic that made this entire evening one of the most memorable of all my World Diabetes Days in all my 22 years on this journey……understanding the nature of it, it was a hugely memorable evening all around.  The unsung heroes are both the behind- the-scenes people who orchestrated the night; and all those who arranged the choreography–brilliantly executed and thoroughly entertaining all.

To say this was ‘just’ an evening of dance would be like saying the Super Bowl is just another football game.  From hip-hop, to modern dance, to ballet to even a trip to Starbucks to see a hugely original dance to Kristen Chenoweth’s Taylor the Latte Boy; yes, this night had it all.  Even an incredible diabetes education segment at the top of Act II…..absolutely flawless.

Dancing for DIabetes LogoFifteen years ago a young tween-ager (at the time), but no less determined,  began Dancing for Diabetes in her driveway in her Florida home.  It was the brainchild of a talented dancer, Elizabeth Stein, who was diagnosed shortly before with T1D.

Not to let diabetes stop her in any way, IN ANY WAY, she began Dancing for Diabetes to help others know that they can do anything while managing their diabetes.  Indeed.  When you see the graceful Elizabeth on home-made videos, you realize just how magnificent and dedicated she was to her craft.  When you see her at work  in a Florida Law office, you see an educated and focused office manager. When you see her speak of Dancing with Diabetes, you see a business woman with a fierce dedication to make this project work outside the boarders of her Florida State.

Dancing girls endBut it is the softness, in this same woman’s eyes, when she speaks of the young dancers who are featured in the second act, all having diabetes.  ‘I remember what it was like to dance and manage this disease.  I know what they are going through.”   And she does.  When she is on one knee speaking to one of her dancers, she walks them through as they manage their diabetes.  An outsider (me), cannot help but ask which is bigger, her knowledge of making Dancing for Diabetes the sharpest, tightest, and most professional evening of dance ever created; or her heart that cares so much for her dancers (and there were hundreds of them) especial those who dance with insulin pumps and CGMs on their waists and attached to their arms.

Awe. Inspiring. Impressed.  And quite frankly a few tears as I remember another little girl who loved dancing a lifetime ago.  On this World Diabetes Day, I was taken back to a little girl who with her diabetes, wanted to dance as well….and dance she did.  Diabetes did not stop her then, and at twenty-five it has not stopped her yet.

In my seat of hundreds of people, I was alone; as tears filled my eyes watching this evening unfold.  This one incredible evening unfold.

Dancing for Diabetes is a nonprofit organization and the Diabetes Research Institute will receive the proceeds from this year’s event.  Elizabeth has an army of friends and family who help her and this is one professionally run evening right down with signs on where to park outside the building.   As I spoke to the sponsors and special guests at the reception following, I said that Dancing with Diabetes should be, no NEEDS to be, in every State of our great country—-and beyond.   Turns out that is Elizabeth’s exact plan.

So if you have a love for dance, or your child does, and you want to learn more about Dancing for Diabetes; send me an email at (write Dancing in the subject line) and I will have Elizabeth get back to you.  It takes some work, but it is a fantastic evening and everyone should share in it.

Dancing for diabetes Elizabeth Head shotIt was a World Diabetes Day to remember and for Elizabeth, by evening’s end, it would be even more-so as her boy friend dropped to one knee and asked her to marry him.   She said yes.

Take THAT diabetes.

I am a diabetes dad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

Diabetes Awareness Day I Created Something You Can Share to People Without Diabetes

Star. CupSo here is something you can share with those people who do not have diabetes.  A simple cup…….with a message. It just seemed to me that instead of it being a controversy, it could be used for a simple message…..a message that could save the life of someone you know and love.   It’s ‘interesting enough’ that local newspaper and media outlets may share it also….share it with them.  Share this with other sites, any sites.  Place this on all social media.  Anywhere where people who know nothing about diabetes may see it.

GDR Warning jpg

If you received this post….kindly click the flyer above and print it out.  Hang it somewhere where people will see it.  Sometimes, at the onset, type 1 diabetes can seem like a flu/or virus; but it’s not.  If someone you know has the signs above, ask your doctor to test for type 1 diabetes immediately.

So if today is about getting a message out……this just may be a way to capture those who know nothing about diabetes, the message is surely there.

Have a GREAT November 14th.

I am a diabetes dad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

Tomorrow is November 14th; Nothing Tops the Reason We Started…….and Nothing Ever Will.

Kaitlyn FlowerI’m all in favor of everything that will happen tomorrow, and for that matter, all this month regarding diabetes.  Happy Birthday tomorrow, Dr. Banting and thank you for creating insulin; it–more than anything else ever discovered, created, invented, researched, and/or implemented is still the single-best finding EVER in the world of diabetes…..and everything else pales in comparison.

But we surely are glad that everything else that has come along and will continue to come along on this journey……aren’t we?

I always find myself thinking many things during this month.  My thoughts come down to one thing each and every year during this month.  Why I got involved in the first place.  And that reason is still a little girl who asked me, in crib/bed at the hospital in 1992 when she said, ‘Daddy, fix.”

No matter what has happened in this journey, it all comes down to her.  And in 2009 her brother was added to that drive.  Two of my three kids having diabetes.  It’s still my single focus and all that matters to me at the end of the day.  It’s why I try not to get caught up in ‘stuff’ that does not interest me.  What interests me is helping others and seeing that one day this disease is cured.  For Kaitlyn.  For Rob.   For others.


Nothing short of that is acceptable in my eyes.  Many things that come along are appreciated but I’m always reminded of the headline when insulin was discovered which stated that it had been cured……..hmmmmmm?…..greatly helped……but not cured.

I have a definition of cured in my mind, and you have what that means to you as well.  We may differ how we will get there.  We may differ on who, or what, will lead the way.  We may differ on what ‘word’ we want to get out to the masses.  We may differ what symbol and/or color should be used to represent us all.  We may differ on who has written what, and how we sometimes want to hug the person, and sometimes we may even want to punch them in the nose.  We may differ on organizations.  We may differ on the emphasis of what is important.

I have said it a million times, just ‘Don’t do Nothing’.  And yet, over the years people have informed me that all they choose to do is take care of what they need to and I have learned we may differ in that thought too.

But at the end of the day;  when we crawl into bed, sign that last letter, post that last comment, give that last dollar, undo that last black-tie, tie that last sneaker, pedal that last bike we need to stop and we should look upon the face that started it all for us.  No we do not need a reminder how we got involved, we will always remember the reason.  But as the thirteenth of November turns into the fourteenth of November, look upon the face of the one who got you here.  Either as they sleep, or by looking at a picture.

And say to yourself yet again: Nothing matters as much.

For me, nothing ever did matter more……and nothing ever will.  Keep that thought and realize just how wonderful you are…….and multiply that by a hundred to realize just how wonderful and special your kids are as well.  And how much their siblings and other relatives and friends have been there to help.

And remember this…… matter WHAT has happened to you in this journey, that face still stands as the single most reason to continue what ever it is that you do. That is Diabetes Awareness Day to me; always has been….always will be….and it happens every day.   You?

I am a diabetes dad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

HEADLINE: Diabetes Caught Twerking in NYC Night Club

twerkI have always found it fascinating how Realty Show Stars and other celebrities capture the headlines.  You know that at least three names jumped into your head as soon as you read the first line of today’s article.

Interesting isn’t it?

There’s always so much discussion how little people know about diabetes.  How much more diabetes needs to be in the media.  “People just do not know about it.”  Yet celebrities and/or pseudo-celebrities CAPTURE the headlines with ridiculous feats of activity that just boggles the mind.  Perhaps we should have diabetes pull a few stunts to get into the headlines.

Ever notice how some major announcements by some of these people coincide with the opening of a movie, book, or television show…… me, it is NO accident.  It got me to wondering……..

“Diabetes parties all night with Kim and Justin in NYC Nightclub.”
“Diabetes……pregnant?  Seen wearing outfit with obvious baby bump.”
“Could diabetes be engaged…..seen sporting huge rock at sporting event.”
“Diabetes’ girlfriend DLo pregnant, and he could no be happier.”
“Diabetes twerks and sends text by accident to 12 million fans.”
“Diabetes in car accident….and pays off lady’s mortgage.”
“Diabetes gives outrageous interview on Tonight Show….jumps up on desk.”

See how it works?  Many people have been attributed with saying, I don’t care what the newspapers say as long as they spell my name correctly. (Mae West, PT Barnum, WC Fields and more).  So as long as it is outrageous, they will print it.

Impacting millions
Costing billions
Causing heartaches
Costing Lives
Tearing apart families
None of that worthy of headlines………that what we have here?

I’m at a loss then.

Think I’ll check-in and see what Khloe is doing tonight??????????

I am a diabetes dad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.




Hey, Yew Look’n at Me???…..Blue Bosses in Charge; Until…….

MOb face in Blue Circle

Here is a fun take/tale on the meeting between ‘bosses’.  Enjoy for Diabetes Awareness Month.  This is my guest blog for Diabetic Lifestyle.

I am a diabetes dad.

Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.


So Many Have Asked about Missed T1D Dx Legislation…..A Suggested “Here’s How To……”

two kidsAfter Pennsylvania became the second state in the Union yesterday to have some sort of Legislation or Resolution passed regarding education of DKA and  the missed diagnosis of T1D, many people wanted to know “How do I do this in my State?”

There is no ‘one way’ but I put together a little bit on what we have learned thus far.
Consider this an “A” how-to article; certainly not “THE” how-to article to get you started.  The reading below is long but it’s a map that can be used to get you started.

You have decided that the rules in your state need to be changed regarding ‘missed diagnosed’ T1 diabetes.  You want to change the paradigm of children entering diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) and you want your state legislator to be involved.  Great.

Now what?

The only way ANYONE became GOOD AT THIS is by doing it……know that as you start.  Do not be afraid to make errors.  Relax.  You know this disease, you live with it every day.  Below are JUST SOME IDEAS.  Add, remove, use what helps and don’t use anything with which you are uncomfortable.

Keep the message straightforward and stay on message/point: Too many kids are being diagnosed in this country with T1 diabetes by going into DKA because flu/virus symptoms are masking the onset of T1 Diabetes DKA. It results in hardship, hospital stays, and even death. A few steps could help prevent it from EVER happening. Stats are not even kept on this phenomena, but we surely know it exists.

The next thing to do is be prepared.  Assume that your representative knows nothing.  Do your homework and see if you can find some statistics from your state about diabetes.  If not, there are plenty of sites that can supply information for you locally, nationally, and globally. Some links: – National – Global

You will try to arrange a meeting with your representative; when s/he is in the local office is best.  If they cannot meet personally with you, but one of their representatives will; take that meeting.  Get to know SOMEONE in that office. Arrange a sit-down; and discuss YOUR story.

Even if you have not experienced DKA at diagnosis but you have a loved one with T1D; that’s fine.  You are speaking of the rise in T1 in this country and why we need to do something about it. After your story, discuss facts about diabetes–share information. From type 1 diabetes: An autoimmune disease that occurs when T cells attack and destroy most of the beta cells in the pancreas that are needed to produce insulin, so that the pancreas makes too little insulin (or no insulin). Without the capacity to make adequate amounts of insulin, the body is not able to metabolize blood glucose (sugar), to use it efficiently for energy, and toxic acids (called ketoacidosis) build up in the body. There is a genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes.

The disease tends to occur in childhood, adolescence or early adulthood (before age 30) but it may have its clinical onset at any age. The symptoms and signs of type 1 diabetes characteristically appear abruptly, although the damage to the beta cells may begin much earlier and progress slowly and silently.

The symptoms and signs include a great thirst, hunger, a need to urinate often, and loss of weight. Among the risks of the disease are serious complications, among them blindness, kidney failure, extensive nerve damage, and accelerated atherosclerosis. The long-term aim with treatment is to avoid these complications or, at the least, to slow their progression. There is no known cure.

From Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis develops when your body is unable to produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as an alternate fuel. This process produces a buildup of toxic acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated.

Explain the difference between T1 and T2. Share other pertinent facts/information. Now ask how s/he may help:
Here is just a partial menu to consider, go over it with your Representative: 1) Parental Education – Physicians provide this education to parents since parents are the “first responders.” Example: Proposed NC Bill that encourages parent education during well-child visits at specific intervals regarding Type 1 Diabetes.

2) Require physicians to give either a finger prick blood test or a urine test to every/any child who enters the office showing flu/virus like symptoms. This would allow the doctor to know if the child has an elevated glucose level.  Although it cannot be a diagnostic tool for T1D, it will surely show that more testing is needed.

3) Educating school children about Type 1 Diabetes at the elementary, middle school, and high school levels. Should this be part of the core curriculum? This may already be in our curriculum. However, to what extent is this covered in school? In what grades is this taught?

4)  Require Physicians to learn about Type 1 Diabetes (and Diabetic Ketoacidosis) as part of their initial and continuing professional education utilizing it for education credits awarded as is required.

5)  Screen populations for children who may go on to develop Type 1 Diabetes by testing for the auto-antibodies of T1D.

6) Seek laws already in existence where new laws may be ‘piggy-backed’.

Ask your legislature what they think could/might/will work? Enter the dialogue and leave with, “What happens next and when should I check back with you?”

You are on your way.

This is the wording that passed the house in NC; it stands ready to be presented to the NC Senate. A BILL TO BE ENTITLED REEGAN’s RULE AN ACT ENCOURAGING PARENT EDUCATION DURING WELL-CHILD VISITS AT SPECIFIC AGE INTERVALS REGARDING TYPE 1 DIABETES The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts: SECTION 1. Chapter 130A of the General Statutes is amended by adding a new section to read: 130A-221.5. Diabetes education as part of well-child care. Each physician, physician’s assistant, or certified nurse practitioner who provides well-child care is encouraged to educate and discuss the warning signs of Type 1 diabetes and symptoms are with each parent for each child under the care of physicians, physician’s assistant, or certified nurse practitioner at least once at the following age intervals: 1. Birth 2. Twelve months of age 3. Twenty-four months of age 4. Thirty-six months 5. Forty-eight months 6. Sixty months.  Section 2. This act becomes effective October 1, 2015 – See more at: (We are well aware that his is a very ‘soft law’ but it is a start.  When this bill passes, we can encourage the State’s Health Commissioner to follow-up with educational material to the medical professionals in the State of North Carolina.  Hopefully son we can say, one down and forty-nine to go. Pediatrics; The Official Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics wrote in the conclusion of their study on the subject matter of DKA in Youth upon Dx:

CONCLUSION: The frequency of DKA in youth with type 1 diabetes, although stable, remains high, indicating a persistent need for increased awareness of signs and symptoms of diabetes and better access to health care……… Cite:  1.   Published online March 31, 2014 Pediatrics Vol. 133 No. 4 April 1, 2014 pp. e938 -e945 (doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-2795)

A recent study to explore the pathway to diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children from the perspective of the child, family, and general practitioner (GP) concluded in their study, “… that the difficulties for parents and GPs in recognizing the early symptoms of T1D suggests that future interventions should be targeted at parents in the appraisal interval and include the importance of timely presentation to a healthcare professional and the differences between type1 and 2 diabetes.
PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS SHOULD ALSO TAKE PARENTAL CONCERNS SERIOUSLY AND DO URINE DIPSTICK TESTS DURING THE CONSULTATION FOR CHILDREN WITH SYMPTOMS OF T1D.”   Cite: (Full study can be found: ) SCIENCE DAILY: (in context) Type 1 diabetes….is estimated to affect around half a million children worldwide, increasing in incidence by an estimated 3% every year. Cite: Society of Endocrinology, Science Daily March 19, 2013 40,000 people are diagnosed each year in the United States Cite: CDC National Statistic Report, 2014

5 Million people in the United States are expected to have T1 Diabetes by 2015, including nearly 600,000 youth.
Cite: JAMA –2014–311: p. 1778-1786

Between 2001-2009 there was a 21% increase in the prevalence of T1 diabetes in people under the age of 20
Cite: JAMA –2014–311: p. 1778-1786

3 million Americans have T1 Diabetes Cite:

Okay: You do not want to go the legislation route, that’s fine.  How about letter writing campaigns to the hierarchy at these organizations painting the picture that something needs to be done.   And enlisting their help to make a difference. The American Association of Family Physicians:
The American Academy of Pediatrics:
The Society of Pediatric Nurses:

All of these organizations have state level ‘chapters’ as well.

Do not be afraid to ask the major diabetes organizations that have advocacy departments to help.

Start a campaign today.

I hope this gives you a start.  I surely do not know all the answers and feel free to go in a completely different direction if you wish but ask yourself constantly: Will this accomplish something tangible.  Follow your heart. Follow your brain.

Saving one person is monumental.  My goal and thought process when I started was; “if we can just see one person’s flu/virus-like symptoms and intervene and see if it is T1–and it is—–I would deem the entire effort worth it.  Just a year into it we know of six children.   That does no help to little Reegan or Kycie; who lost their battle—-but in their names (and others) we can change this and we will change this because we choose to just ‘Not do Nothing.”

God bless you on this journey.  And thanks for caring.

I am a diabetes dad.

Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.