Creating an Ad About Our Child’s Life……….Not So Easy…..Try It!!!

MAD-MEN-logoSo there is this movie making the rounds out in the diabetes community.  My discussion today is not about that particular movie but, rather, the discussion that surrounded that topic.  After reading many comments, it is clear that people have very strong feelings about it and had many comments about it.

If anything, it is very clear that to produce something that has a universal message is very, very difficult.  In most cases, our kids look and act as if there is nothing wrong; that is a good thing.  But make no mistake about it; the films, commercials, public service announcements, and ads that we have witnessed rely on the premise that they have to ‘move you’ to have the viewer act.  Get involved, do something, but in most cases; make a donation.

This, in most cases, is the goal.  Which is fine, that is the point and we get that point……..in most cases.  Showing any kids playing and having fun and at the end asking for a donation, I would imagine, would leave the viewer thinking, “…….what I am I giving money for, these kids look fine?”

The media world is not an exact science but the professionals who create these spots are pros.  More than I am; and I have some experience in this field.  When I see anything, my first question is always the same; “What is the intent of the piece I am looking at?”  If there is no clear-cut answer (like some sort of action step asked, like a donation) than I am left to judge something as an artistic piece or even sometimes, me not having any idea what the piece is about.

When it comes to the creation of media, it is extremely difficult to get your message across in a concise (short) amount of time and yet make it compelling enough so the viewer stays with it, engages with it, and is left feeling ‘something’ about what they just saw.  That ‘something’ is open for the creator; and by doing so, the audience can watch, judge, and or comment about the piece.

Right or wrong?  Well that is a different discussion.  So is offensive.  Unless it is  stated before, or someone asked the creator what the intent is; the audience is left up to their own decision-making.  Perfect example of this is the final 5 seconds of the HBO smash hit The Sopranos.  The ending of the entire series just went to black in the last five seconds.  And that was it.

The ‘good’ and the ‘bad’ of that decision has been argued to this day.

So here is the deal.  It is very easy to watch something and say how we feel.  To form an opinion and share what we watched; well that is certainly much easier than creating a spot.  So here is my question to you; you have the ability to make a thirty second spot; what does your commercial say?  Or, what is the tag line on a billboard or an ad–what does it look like?

Let’s take a crack at it.  One, you will see just how difficult it is; and two, maybe we can come up with something really worth a try.

Please share by hitting reply on this article as this gets shared in many different location.  Let’s take a stab at being on Madison Avenue………send your idea for an ad…..not unlike the TV show Madmen (show about advertising on AMC)……we’ll be MadDOC.  Try it.

I am a diabetes dad.

Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

 

0 thoughts on “Creating an Ad About Our Child’s Life……….Not So Easy…..Try It!!!

  • Marcia Collart says:

    We are just starting to figure out the world of driving with our daughter who has Type 1. She works at retail store, thus, crazy hours. One night over the holidays she worked until 1 am. When she went out to her car to leave, she tested (yea!) and was low. The low turned into lower as she sat in the dark, deserted parking lot in the middle of the night, treating, waiting and testing until she could drive home. We have lived with her diabetes for 6 years, and never thought of this possibility. That’s the problem, just when you figure it out, something new comes along. No idea how to show that in 30 seconds! Probably can’t because nothing about this disease is quick and easy!

  • Anna KOtarski says:

    So my idea that comes across my mind: the title would be a “vicious killer” or “silent killer”, first I would show a shot of a normal, not so happy, not so sad person/child wearing his/her pump doing the everyday tasks, then I would show a shot of whats going on inside the body, things like organs shutting down, nerves tissue damaged by particles (glucose) floating around or brain shutting down with not enough of these particles and then I would show two options: one of a person who is happy and healthy living a carefree life and another shot of not so happy person that got affected by the side effects of the diabetes, even a death (and that is the part that our kids will see 🙁 ), which we as parents will have to explain to them when this happens.The message in the video I would hope would generate a person viewing obligated to donate money for a cure. I would say the option to make another child living a carefree life is yours. Please donate for a cure. That is my vision of a short movie 🙂 Im interested of others.

  • I am constantly reminding myself and my daughter how far we have come and that that there is hope for the future. I would love to somehow see the timeline of progress we have made. From the death sentence of less than 1 year, starvation diet treatments, discovery of insulin, test strips, pumps, CGM. etc. Showing the struggles that diabetics go through. I would end with a child running carefree like all the other children. A child that doesn’t need to constantly check their blood sugar or count carbs because he/she either has an artificial pancreas or encapsulation. With a call to action. Make this dream a reality…Donate to … or something catchy.

  • Debbie George says:

    I would first show our kids playing sports then a quick shot of them checking their blood sugar and have the meter show a low. Have them drink juice to raise. Then a quick shot of a friend asking our child to do a sleepover and the mom shaking her head no. Then show child in bed later checking bs being low and mom saying “this is why we don’t do sleepovers” or something like that. There needs to be the normal life people see but also the behind the scenes with the end saying being “You don’t know what goes on behind closed doors, please help find the cure by donating today.”

    • hmmmmmmmm…….good ideas…….that said—from the time Kaitlyn was 6, we never said no to a sleepover and she always went……we had to pick her up and take her home only once. But I get the idea……let me think more on/about it. You gave very good food for thought.
      Thank you.

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