Dear 2018……..uhmmmmm…..’gotta minute?

dearsantaletter-outDear 2018,

Nice to meet you and we look forward to your arrival.
You may not know me fully but I’m pretty sure we both know of each other well enough from others, and I was told to contact you for the things that might be important during this upcoming year in my world; which is a world of diabetes.

I get it.  You’ll have people with long lists regarding the state of affairs here and abroad.  You will have people screaming on both sides of what is correct from their standpoint which they will insist is in the best interests of all…….sort of impossible, I know, but they will insist.

You will also have people asking for incredible mountainous requests for sick relatives and dire situations.  All-in-all, I do not envy you your situation.  Not only will you not make everyone happy, it’s my guess you will make only precious few as happy as they may want.  Powerful is the individual who recognizes that they cannot do anything about what enters their world but it’s what they do with what comes along that creates the path they walk.  We are each faced with that task.  Life is life; and no matter where we are in this world…..we are given life to deal with and manage.

With all of this in mind, it’s also my understanding that you take requests. It has been made clear to me, 2018, that you are not Santa Claus but that request can be made and you will sort through and figure out what is best and that asking is completely encouraged.

Okay…….so here we go.  This is my request for our diabetes world.  Others may chime in as needed.

First and always, I want a cure.  I’ve been asking this for some time and although I have not been one of those who point and say they have been promising it within the next five years (who are those people anyway?), I think it’s time.  Or, at least, some REAL significant progress toward that end.  Some clinical (human) trials in kids…..something promising please.

We also need some stability in the insulin world when it comes to pricing.  Either allow some of the cases to come to trial that make/prove definitive and serious allegations to force lower costs, or have someone come up with a generic brand that will shake the foundations of those who think they control all costs—-the prices are too high, 2018, please look into this matter.

Please help us make a REAL dent in our journey to stop the missed diagnosis of T1D.  No one should die or be missed diagnosis that in turn causes major havoc in people’s lives.  IT’S JUST SO AVOIDABLE, 2018, it’s almost ridiculous.  Thank you for the continued efforts of so many—-it’s MAKING a difference but we need to really make this a national initiative.

Health care costs.  Okay here is the deal, us in the diabetes word ARE NOT THE ONLY ones asking about this 2018.  YOU HAVE GOT TO KNOW BY NOW how important this issue is for so many causes, so many people, and so many reasons?  A group of fat cats in our Nation’s Capitol can no longer be allowed to merely make changes without fully understanding of what the impact will be…’s a mess 2018, please both tend to, and fix, this situation.

Management tools.  2018, I am not just  referring to a device that reads blood sugar and dispenses insulin; I’m talking about all management tools.  There needs to be a healthy array of available equipment and not controlled by just one or two companies.  This just makes no sense.  Never before have people (patients, loved ones of patients) been so nervous that what is available today will not be available tomorrow.  Medicare and Medicaid need to cover what is needed and we all need to know that what is needed will always be available.  It’s just not fair.

2018, these are all practical and needed request and understood, they are all tall orders.  But I have faith in you and believe in you.  From the fiasco of diabetes issues 2017 left behind, my hope is that you are better, stronger, and more aware of how to navigate the waters-of-need for all those who do not want to just live with diabetes, but thrive with it.

Good luck 2018, we be in touch to see how you are doing.
I am a diabetes dad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

The Night Before D-Christmas—2017

Santa Claus magic dustWith special apologies to Clement Moore. I present what has become a DiabetesDad tradition……an updated, ‘Twas the Night Before D-Christmas for 2017

‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house,
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse.
The meters, CGMs, and supplies were put away with such care,
In hopes that Santa would bring the cure with him this year.

The children were nestled from head to their feeties,
While thoughts in their head were no more diabetes.
And mamma in her ‘kerchief, she prayed for the cure too,
A dad still wonders what else could he do.

Remembering this year; and things we did see,
Like MiniMed’s Hybrid they call the 670G;
Away to the D-Community to see who was a hero on fire,
It’s those who battle T1D who really inspire

As costs continue to rise and wallets get thin,
We fought hard for lower costs of insulin.
The community raised voices loud and concise,
Costs are too far and need to be lower in price.

It was tough this year as great ones left out the door,
Just some were Keith Campbell and Mary Tyler Moore.
Their voices were loud and their voices were clear,
They will surely be missed, wish they could stay near.

Others will take the lead and we will all see
Better products, more work, and good advocacy.
Better pumps, insulin, and CGMS by the score,
There’s plenty coming and we’re screaming for more.

Although some tough times happened and we were sad,
Animas closing, costs too high and true, we were mad.
But onward we go staying positive all the way,
There’s so much to do, and it all starts today.

Fighting for many and trying to be fair,
Coverage for one, coverage for all, even with Medicare.
Human trials, products, not just for our self,
Diabetes tattoos, even CGM for Elf on a Shelf.

Hurricanes were cruel where they would roam,
Far away sure, but also at home.
Many worked hard helping where they could,
So many doing and helping as they all should.

Many stepped up to help and grabbed at the ball,
Helping some was no good, it had to be all.
Helping others and giving so very deep,
Hours and days they all went and went without sleep.

When you look outside at the fresh fallen snow,
so many are doing and so many you don’t know,
Think of those who inspire and soon you’ll see,
Things will move forward and continue to be.

Life is not the greatest fighting this disease.
Continue to ask as you drop to your knees
That things will get better and rightfully quick,
Good things to come, and not all from St. Nick.

So listen carefully as you think what needs to be done,
If you have an idea, take it and run.
Don’t leave it to others; it’ll be just a few,
“Don’t do nothing” is what you really must do.

And if you think you’re done, tired, and feeling sort of sore,
Think of your loved one with diabetes, it’ll make you do more.
And if not for you, it will be for their sake,
We won’t stop at all till they get a break.

And then, in a twinkling, one day we’ll hear on the roof,
The prancing and pawing of each little hoof.
And the only thing needed in Santa’s bag for sure,
Is when diabetes is gone because of a cure.

So we will all continue to work, the ‘where’ is up to you,
But you have to make the decision on something you’ll do.
And one day we’ll scream and exclaim, “diabetes is gone from sight,”
The Happiest Christmas ever, and to all a good-night!
I am a diabetes dad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

Annual Tradition Continues—–Your Child and a Personal Santa Letter

Jolly holiday 7th Annual fundraiser benefits Diabetes Research Institute Foundation
NOTE: Your child does not have to have diabetes to receive a letter from Santa (cute video—click picture)

Yes, Virginia (and Emma, and Maria, and Max, and Willie…), there is a Santa Claus. To prove it, Ol’ Saint Nick himself will send a personalized letter – complete with a North Pole stamp – to any child, in any part of the world for a minimum donation to the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation. This jolly holiday fundraiser is up and running and you can click this SANTA CLAUS to learn how to send a letter and make a donation. Your child receiving a personal letter from Santa is certain to light up faces brighter than the star on the tree. And of course if you do not know of anyone who would want a letter from Santa….you can make a donation to just help the DRI continue their collaborative efforts to end diabetes once and for all.

Click here to learn more about the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation.

The personalized letters, which can be requested by parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles or any other family member or friend, can include all sorts of information; like a reference to any toy, game, iPad or techno-gadget on the child’s wish list or even mention something about their pet. Santa can even encourage them and that he knows how well they have been trying to manage their diabetes as well. The fundraising campaign is open to all families everywhere, not just those affected by diabetes.

To get all of the letters out to children by Christmas day, a legion of Santa’s “elves” are standing by around the country, according to volunteer chairwoman Marie Jarcho.

“We had a tremendous response the last seven years. This is a wonderful and easy way to brighten a child’s Christmas and they loved it. The more information that parents or others supply, the more personal Santa’s letter will be,” she said. “…… it is my sincere hope that people will give what they can to help the Diabetes Research Institute find a cure.”

After the debut event, one mother wrote that her child was so thrilled with the personalized letter that she slept with it every night until Christmas. The DRI Foundation is hoping for an even greater response this year.

To send a child a letter from Santa Claus, JUST CLICK HERE or you can click the picture to see a really cute Santa Video about the personalized letters. The deadline for participation is midnight on December 11th in the USA and December 6th for any area outside the USA.

I am a diabetes dad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

Halloween and Diabetes….Be Afraid…..Be VERY Afraid……REALLY? Nope. Boo.

Insulin PumpFrom three years ago and updated but still a treat (get it?)…..enjoy.  Happy Halloween.

Within the next week will be Halloween. Halloween means so much to kids. Our kids with diabetes are no exception. I remember when Kaitlyn was younger and many neighbors bought stickers and toys for Kaitlyn; “…I did not know what to get for her”, Was a common response.  Not really necessary, but we just said thank you for their thoughtfulness…..and they were very; thoughtful.  People can surely be wonderful.

We were discussing this weekend, over coffee, that each year there was no doubt with all of the walking that Kaitlyn would do that ‘going low thing’ and it would not only occur; but almost always at the exact same block each year. (Spooky, huh?)  She would carefully choose something out of her bag full of treats (of course juice boxes and ‘stuff needed’ were readily available ‘just in case’—but letting her choose something from her Trick or Treat bag…why not?). We would wait a few minutes and continue on. Fun and frights continued.

By time she was out on her own in junior high school (in an era of no CGM like DEXCOM may I add) she was pretty well versed on how the drill worked on Halloween. In a recent conversation neither Jill nor I could remember any major adjustment on this date (and remember prior articles of mine stating Kaitlyn was considered as ‘brittle’, which translated meant she was extremely tough to control….it was a phrase we hated). On this day our kids strive and want to be just like all the others kids…….AND THEY SHOULD BE.

Let them.

I remember many conversations from people over the years who do not live with diabetes; how much Halloween must be a ‘disaster’ for us, having a child “who cannot eat candy”. People thought that we would deprive our child of this incredible right-of-passage. Those of us ‘in the know’ know better, don’t we? 😉

If you do not know….you should learn how close to normal you can make this day. Our kids are not driving close to a cliff during this day.  Don’t treat it as such.   Yes, be smart but every time you feel the word ‘no’ coming on……change it to making it about choices.

Of course we would control the candy; some gave money in exchange, some put the candy outside for the GREAT PUMPKIN to take and exchange for a toy; but we always controlled what the kids ate, what ALL THE KIDS ate; and we went through it all like every other parent did each year (you would be surprised how much leeway THIS gave us on removing ‘stuff’, think about it).

We all do/did ‘Halloween’ things.

There are many things that you can find online about kids, diabetes, and what to do. Today I want to check in with where YOUR head’s at.  Parents? You should not be afraid (pun intended) of this day and you should spend the time enjoying your kids while they enjoy the day.

Diabetes never stopped us on Halloween, never missed a day in all those years; and it should not stop you either. Go and enjoy. This is a holiday for kids to enjoy and with a little knowledge and a little ‘smarts’, the only frightening thing about the day should be at your front door when the doorbell rings.

Be afraid…… very afraid? Nah…….enjoy; Halloween is nothing to ‘spook’ you.
…….and as a side note; Kaitlyn sits as an RN to take her CDE test in January.  Yes my dear colleagues/parents-in-arms…….They. Can. Do. Anything.
I am a DiabetesDad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.


Does Anyone EVER Forget the Hospital Hallway?…..a New Family Just Found Out!

Hospital HallwayA two-year-old little boy was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes recently.  I don’t have permission to share their family’s story, so let’s call him L, and say he was from Minnesota for the purpose of this story.

Through a lifetime of twists and turns and people in far away places, L’s dad and another man met recently.  Under normal circumstances, one would think it impossible that these two men would ever cross paths.  They come from different states and different backgrounds but the older man knew a few things.  He had been at this ‘diabetes thing’ for a few years longer than L’s daddy.

His child was diagnosed at a time when insulin pumps were not in wide use as of yet, CGM were just 3 initials, and ‘hope’ was more a girl’s name than anything else.  The older man sighed and forced a smile, “As well as my child is doing, I wish it was in today’s world than when we started.  The world in diabetes is much different today.”

And that is an absolutely true statement and we should all stop and reflect on what is happening today.  Better treatment, better tools, and so many centers now looking at something to get the body back to producing insulin again.  Some things will take longer than others but being diagnosed today, certainly is much better than years ago.

The older man walked along the beach recently.  He thought of his new friend, his son L who he never met, and L’s Mommy who was home in Minnesota.  He never met her either but he knows……..oh yes he knows her very well.  He knows the hospital smell, the hospital crib, the day bed in the room, the walks in the hospital hallway, and even the clock ticking in the late hours. The I.V. lines, learning to stick a child with a needle and hoping the child will not hate them because of the inflicting pain to keep them alive. He knows her tears, her fears, her hopes and he knows the look in her eyes.  He never forgot that look because just like this family, his child was two when diagnosed as well, and that child’s mommy had the same look.  It’s a look of a pain that no one who is not going through it will ever understand, only those who go through it will.  It’s a look never to be forgotten.

But it’s a much different world than it was 25 years.  Many new developments, many new management tools, and the idea that our children won’t live with this disease forever is just a little more believable today.  That older man has seen a lot and has never lost an iota of hope on all of these great things now available presently and hope for in the future.  The older man also knows that this disease surely sucks whenever it strikes and that has not changed one iota either.  But the older man understands L’s mommy.  That family reminds him why the drive must stay alive and must stay important until one day the disease is no more, as it was the day he became involved. He wants L’s mommy and daddy to know this with all of their heart.

The older man believes this with all his heart as well, because he remembers it all.  I know this because the older man is me.
I am a DiabetesDad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

Everything is Not Always as Appears

rooftop 1As many people know,  I spend a good deal of time up in the air.  Traveling is a part of my job and as I travel to so many places, I share that “I have to do what I do….I am driven.”   For my two kids with type 1 diabetes (T1D), I will travel anywhere I can to try to make a difference.  For the many people with whom I interact, they do what they do because of the goodness in their heart and I’m moved by so many, so often.

Many times people will ask me about ‘something’ in the news that has garnered headlines and being touted as something…… truth…….it is not.  I do not remember the words “fake news” until fairly recently and in the diabetes world, make no mistake……it exists.  Now there is a difference between varying philosophies and stories; that are just made up.  Treatments, elixirs, truth, and fiction all must be treated with caution because the plain in simple truth is because ‘someone’ says it……does not make it so.

So the picture above looks like it was taken at 38,000 feet from a plane and clearly, you can see the two metal structures that sit in the middle of the dense trees with various amounts of clearings mixed in.  Flying overhead one starts to think about those structures and what could be their possible use in the middle of such a forest?

Well, truth be known, the picture above was not taken from an airplane and, in actuality, was taken from my hotel window.  And it sits upon a rooftop.   Really my only and simple point is this; not everything is as it appears to be and in these ever and changing days, nothing can be taken at face value without checking facts.

It’s up to each and every one of us to make sure what we hear and learn………is truth. Because sometimes when people are shouting from the treetops, they’re doing nothing more than screaming from a ledge.
rooftop 2
Think about it.
I am a DiabetesDad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

The Juice Box on the Nightstand

Juice boxOh yeah……diabetes……that?……yeah; no—-it does not go away.  Kaitlyn came to visit with us last weekend.  If you don’t know my daughter I will let you in on the fact that I have stated a million times; that she is the type of person who honestly becomes excited when opening stocking stuffer gifts at Christmas time. She just loves life and her love for life is infectious.  Always was……..and hope it always will be.

Kaitlyn was in town to shop for a wedding gown, which she did with her mom.  Her excitement was evident and off they went.  When she speaks of Andre, her fiance; what’s new at work; or her wedding plans…… feel all she feels as all of the excitement just shines out of Kaitlyn.  When you say her name to people, they usually smile.  Kaitlyn does that to people.   Just like her mom.

We have always taught our kids that wherever they go to leave te place better than when they arrived.  I dropped her off at the airport and returned home. The house surely felt a little emptier than it was just hours before.   As I ‘busied’ myself I went into Kaitlyn’s room and saw the juice box as I pictured it above,

I sat on the bed and cried.

It served as a reminder that the work we started is not done.  It cannot BE DONE until our kids are cured.  Kaitlyn has been out of the house now for years, and yet the juice box that remained, served as a stark reminder that no matter what she does; no matter the successes she has at work, in life, and reaching personal goals the fact remains that she crashes through diabetes ‘to get it all done’ and it reminds me yet, again,  she still lives with the beast that moved in when she was just 2, over 25 years ago.  I’ve not forgotten and, surely, neither has she.

So when people ask me why I’m still ‘at this’ with the same energy I’ve had since day one, my answer is simple……because I hate the juice box on the nightstand.  Always did, always will.  When the juice box goes away…….I’ll take a break………not one second before.  Because I promised her that on September 26th, 1992……and that promise is sill as strong on May 18th, 2017.  We will get there baby….daddy promises.  Still.  Kknn.

I am a DiabetesDad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

A Controversy Over a Defiant Little Girl……..Why? The Diabetes Community Surely Understands.

Fearless BullI was in lower Manhattan this week for a DRI Event (which was wonderful) and across from the front entrance were two famous artworks that have become the fodder for many who like to create, said, fodder.  “Charging Bull” has enjoyed the spot for some time since 1987 when Arthur DiModica dropped (literally) it off in the dark of night as a gift, but for the past few months, the spot is now shared……..and may it stay that way forever.

State Street Global Advisors commissioned artist, Kristin Visbal, to create ‘Fearless Girl” to stand opposite the raging bull in defiance to the powerful breathe and force of the overpowering dominant animal, with the meaning that women could stand-up to, and in, the male-dominated financial and corporate world.  I had heard about this artwork and decided to have a picture taken with it/her.
fearless Girl

But before I did, I stood back.  I love art and I wanted to see what was going on.  I knew there was ‘some hubbub’ out there about the two artworks but really did not pay it much heed.

I looked at the two artworks, I watched individually at first…and as a unit together. Both in their own right say much to the observer……..and clearly both can stand absolutely alone.  How do you change a meaning of one huge animal artwork bearing down on anything in its path?  Place a little girl in front of it with hands on her hips in defiance of any intimidation whatsoever.

In my observation, the artwork of the two pieces as one statement is a million times more powerful than standing alone as two separate pieces.  Both could stand opposite many artworks and have a different meaning but these two are now linked forever as much as any other pair who came together for destiny to serve as the glue for all time moving forward.  Lewis & Martin,  Branca & Thomson, Hamilton & Burr, and now Fearless Girl & Charging Bull.

But, as those who know this column can imagine, I did not see that little girl as a female standing up to the male dominance that she defies as the artist was commissioned, no, I saw a different meaning and as any observer knows about artwork, that is well within my right as much as the artist’s intent.

I saw I guess my daughter, but really all kids who are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The defiance is loud and it is clear.   The power of diabetes (the bull) thinking that it will have its way with any child but yet, in their little bodies, they stand to stare the giant down.  Defiant, confident, proud.  “C’mon, you beast, you will not win.”   In all of the rumblings about these two artworks, I saw one artwork.  I saw our children standing up to something so much bigger than themselves…….and winning.

Please feel free to see what the artist’s work was meant to represent but also understand that art can mean many things to many different people and can be as different as the person who views it.  One thing is clear, this little girl is fearless no matter who she represents……..and THAT…… no bull.
I am a DiabetesDad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

This is Really Cool…FRIDAY is Superhero Day…SHARE SHARE SHARE


Anyone who knows me knows that I’m more interested in battling diabetes, and NOT battling each other.  It’s why on many occasions I’m more than happy to share something merely because……well…’s cool; no matter who the person, organization, and/or entity is who came up with the idea.  If it’s cool…….share it.

Today, my wonderful and talented colleagues at the DRI(F) have come up with a Superhero idea.  It has always been my contention that as wonderful as so many celebs are in the diabetes world…..they are not the only heroes.  So are the kids who live their lives to the fullest and doing it with T1D and doing it every day right in our homes, hometowns, and schools.

A #T1DSuperhero might not be able to leap tall buildings in a single bound, but those with type 1 diabetes take on heroic actions every single day to conquer the challenges of living with the disease. On Friday, April 28, join the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation in honoring all the T1D superheroes–those who live with type 1 diabetes and the families, friends, and caregivers who support them.

Help raise awareness for T1D and the need to find a cure by changing your profile picture on social media to this special #T1DSuperhero graphic.

Download the free graphic here and change your profile pic now!
Also get a sneak peek at our new public service announcement, featuring our very own T1D superheroes–our DRI scientists who are working to find a cure. You can be a #T1DSuperhero, too!  There is also a really cool superhero video on the page as well. So if you have, or have a loved one with diabetes, change your FB page for tomorrow, Friday, Superheroes Day.

I am a DiabetesDad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.

A Loss of a Daughter—-One Man Teaches Us that a Broken Heart is NO Reason to Stop

A closeup image of a broken heart.

Stacy Joy Goodman passed away in her sleep last night.
Those were the words as they were relayed to me 23 years ago, this date, and it still shakes me to this day. The world outside of diabetes, was not too unlike it is today. Nelson Mandela became inaugurated, a President visited other countries, the NY Rangers would win the Stanley Cup, and new shows entitled ER and Friends would debut.  The world continued.  But within this local diabetes community, the world changed forever.  Stacy was 17 and had type 1 diabetes.

We were only into this ‘diabetes journey’ about a year and a half.  I was very new at an organization called JDF (now JDRF) as their first Long Island Executive Director.  The volunteer leadership involved, who hugely intimidated me with their business successes, I knew I was in way over my head.  Me, as an ‘Executive’ ANYTHING seemed silly at best.  I was 35 and this ‘fundraising for diabetes’ was so new for me. Geez Louise, I was an actor, not a fundraiser.  I had done some fundraising in my life and surely got the knack how to get things done, but THIS, with the passion and the huge amount of these wealthy individuals, was so very new to me.

Since that time, many of those very same people became my closest friends in this fight.  But in 1994, the day Stacy Joy would pass away, we would all be crushed.
There was no instant news across the world via any social media.  If something happened it either happened in your back yard or it took weeks before you would even hear of something like this.  This did not happen in our backyard—-it happened right inside our house.

This was new to me, the realization that this disease could actually take a life.  ‘Things’ that happened would happen to others, much older, not to us….our kids involved in the chapter were 17, 15, 22, and (at the time) mine had just turned 4, and having diabetes since she was diagnosed at age two.  But not for a second did I ever think this disease could actually take a child……or that it WOULD take a child.

Stacy’s mom was the Chapter Co-President.  Her dad and his wife were out-of-town. There was screaming, sadness, and tears………oh so, so, so, many tears.  A short time after the funeral I remember sitting at my desk.  It was about 8:30 pm and everyone had left the office hours earlier.  I was staring, staring straight ahead.  Tears rolled down my cheeks.  I. Was. So. Angry.  A realization came to me in a two stage thought process; it was clear to me now that this disease could take anyone it wanted.  Anyone.  The second thought process was that there had to be an equalizer in this disease.  I had to do more for my own education and to try to bring people to the table who could help end this disease forever.

Somewhere out there was Stacy’s dad.  Our roads had crossed minimally at best.  This is where all of our worlds were changing because Marc began a mission.  His daughter had a strong liking for the medical field.  Marc was determined to find the best place that was on the receiving end from the organizations out there.  Who were they funding and why?  He literally searched the globe.  The many organizations raising money to fund research were great but Marc wanted to be where the science was occurring and who was the best at it.

It was a time where one did not just ‘google’ anything—-one had to visit in person.  And Marc and his wife, Esther did just that.  Again, again, and again.  Stacy deserved that effort.  They landed at the Diabetes Research Institute at the University fo Miami.  It was rare (still is actually) for a place to be single-focused on curing type 1 diabetes.  But that was (and still is) their mission.  Their goal.

But the point of my story today is about Marc (and his wife Esther).  Over the years, whenever it seems that I’m overwhelmed, I think of them.  On this date, 23 years ago, they could have disappeared, who would have blamed them?

But they did quite the opposite.

They threw themselves completely into this battle.  A battle that would have absolutely no chance of helping their daughter.  But to provide the hope that one day to create a possibility where no one would have to undergo what they went through.  To be given a hope that some place was out there completely driven to accomplish their single goal to cure this disease.  Marc and Esther joined the (DRIF) Board and stayed with it until he was Chairman.  And when he was done in that position, he stayed with it still, going back on the board.  And still to this day he serves.

But yet it’s Marc’s eyes when he talks about the things that might have been for Stacy Joy, and when he looks you straight in the eyes and says, “We will change this.”  And he believes today as when he first started his mission shortly after Stacy’s death …….and one will believe him.  Because when one hears his story and what he has done to advance research forward and what he has done with absolute sorrow in his heart…..well that will humble one…….right down to their very knees at night when they pray.  I know this because I am one.

I was there the day Stacy Joy passed and I am here today for my kids…..and when I ever need a reminder I merely glance over at my good friend Marc Goodman, who reminds me as he continues on his journey, reminds every researcher, and reminds anyone else who is in this fight………that actions speak louder than any spoken words and Marc’s actions have shaken this very diabetes world still to this day…….and we are all better off for it.   But to thank someone who has lost so much seems futile to me; to do it to Marc, or Esther, or Jane, or Michelle, or Bob, or Jen, or anyone else who has lost their child…..seems so empty; so I honor all fo them every day the best way I am able, by staying at it with every ounce I have……’s the absolute least any of us can do.
I am a DiabetesDad.
Please visit my Diabetes Dad FB Page and hit ‘like’.